Baines Simmons Knowledge EASA Regulatory Updates

EASA Regulatory Updates

Updated regularly, our Regulatory Updates page will keep you up-to-date with recent and proposed changes to EU Regulations and EASA Agency Measures relating to air operations and airworthiness. In addition, we also review and highlight information published by the UK CAA where relevant.

Material is reviewed and articles added as soon as practicable after publication by EASA, the European Commission, or the UK CAA, as applicable.

Previous updates

If you would like to see any previous regulatory update documents, please click on the relevant edition below:

 Update 11 - October 2022 | Update 10 - July 2022Update 9 - May 2022

Our most recent update

Below, you will find the most recent regulatory update. Click on each header to expand each section.

Updated December 14th 2022

Update 12 - December 2022

1. Introduction

EASA Covid 19 Updates

Whilst disruption due to Covid 19 has reduced within the aviation industry EASA is continuously devising methods to ensure that operations can continue as normal as possible while remaining safe and the Agency recognises there are significant matters that need to be tackled. EASA remains fully committed to meet the needs of the industry so that aviation can remain operational and safe for everyone.

The links below provide links to all EASA (multiple domain) coronavirus-related information.

https://www.easa.europa.eu/the-agency/coronavirus-covid-19

https://www.easa.europa.eu/easa-covid-19-resources

https://www.easa.europa.eu/covid-19-references

2. EASA General & Generic Updates

9th November 2022

EASA review of standard passenger weights in 2022 shows no significant change


https://www.easa.europa.eu/en/newsroom-and-events/news/easa-review-standard-passenger-weights-2022-shows-no-significant-change


The Agency conducted a survey to obtain actual data on the average mass of passengers and luggage on domestic, international, and intercontinental flights.

This follows a previous Pan-European study on the standard mass of passengers and baggage conducted by EASA in 2008, building on work started by the Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA). The study aimed to review the mass of passengers, hand baggage, and checked baggage used to for aircraft mass and balance calculations.

The 2008 study indicated that the standard masses of male and female passengers and the checked baggage were higher than the initial figures. The study recommended conducting a new survey in 10 years’ time as the average mass of the European population was expected to increase.

For this reason, in 2021 EASA contracted Lufthansa Consulting to conduct a field survey and obtain the average weight of passengers, the weight of hand luggage and the weight of checked luggage at six airports, representing different regions in Europe: ATH (Athens Eleftherios Venizelos, Greece), BRU (Brussels, Belgium), CPH (Copenhagen-Kastrup, Denmark), MXP (Milan Malpensa, Italy), MUC (Munich Franz Josef Strauß, Germany), SOF (Sofia, Bulgaria).

The survey was conducted in person at the selected airports. To collect the highest amount of data the fieldworkers were close to the boarding points and locations with a constant flow of passengers. It should be noted that participation in the survey was exclusively voluntary.

In total 4,164 passengers were surveyed with their hand luggage and 1,998,070 checked luggage data sets were obtained from the airport luggage handling systems. The sampling was conducted during the winter season and the summer season of 2022. Despite the expectation when launching the survey, mean masses of passengers did not significantly change from the previous study from 2008-9, both for male and female passengers.

The results can be summarised below:
No significant weight gain or loss observed for passengers in general.

  • Male passengers have a mean weight of 82.2 kg, which is 14.7 kg more than the average female passenger (67.5 kg).
  • Male passengers take more carry-on luggage with them than female passengers. Business passengers take more than leisure travellers. Medium and long-haul passengers take more than short-haul passengers.
  • The average weight of checked luggage, which is always limited by the luggage policies of the airlines, was 0.8kg less than stated in the 2008-9 study and averaged 16 kg.

The 2021-22 survey concludes that the mean value of all passengers is 76.3 kg. The carry-on weight is on average 7.7 kg. So, the mean passenger weight for adults plus the carry-on luggage is 84.0 kg. As the current regulation indicates 84.0 kg the Agency will not consider its update at this stage. However, to measure possible long-term effects of COVID and other contingent factors like the war in Ukraine and the shift to remote working the Agency considers repeating the survey in 5 years’ time.

 

11th November 2022

EASA publishes proposals to reduce risk of post-crash fire for rotorcraft

https://www.easa.europa.eu/en/newsroom-and-events/news/easa-publishes-proposals-reduce-risk-post-crash-fire-rotorcraft


The European Union Aviation Safety Agency has published an NPA for consultation which aims to address the risk of a post-crash fire in the event of a survivable rotorcraft accident.
NPA 2022-10 proposes to reduce the risk of a post-crash fire by requiring the installation of a crash-resistant fuel system (CRFS) for newly produced rotorcraft and, within a defined timescale, for existing rotorcraft that are operated in Europe.

Since 1994, any newly certified rotorcraft has been required to comply with the requirements for a crash-resistant fuel system. However there are still rotorcraft types that are being produced and operated in Europe that were certified before this date.

It is anticipated that the proposed regulatory changes contained in this NPA will provide an increase in the safety level of the European rotorcraft fleet whilst providing a pragmatic period of time for compliance.

The NPA is open for public comment until February 13, 2023.

16th November 2022

EASA and FAA join forces to present new roadmap for air-ground connectivity

https://www.easa.europa.eu/en/newsroom-and-events/press-releases/easa-and-faa-join-forces-present-new-roadmap-air-ground


The European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have launched a joint cooperation initiative to rethink aviation connectivity, publishing a White Paper proposal for the modernisation and harmonisation of the aviation data communication landscape by 2035.

Airbus and Boeing, as aviation stakeholders, contributed to the study, providing insight and information which allowed EASA and the FAA to elaborate the vision presented in the white paper.

Aviation connectivity supports the various air-ground data exchanges that are essential to support safe, sustainable air traffic management (ATM) and efficient air operations. It does not include the provision of broadband services to passengers.

The exchanges are currently supported by a set of technologies that rely to a large extent on limited-bandwidth links, such as Very High Frequency (VHF) datalink and first-generation aviation SATCOM. While these technologies have served the aviation community well for decades, the systems as currently deployed are fragmented and not always interoperable. There is a need to look to the future and bring the system up to modern-day standards making use of technologies such as broadband.

In addition to the desire to modernise, there is a pressing need for the aviation community to converge on what should be the common solutions of tomorrow due to increasing demand on these systems. This is due to the fact that future air traffic management concepts, optimised airline operations and maintenance of latest generation aircraft will depend on safe, secure and high-capacity connectivity solutions.

Key objectives for the project were that the future connectivity landscape must provide the required safety, security and performance levels as well as sufficient capacity. A further aim was to make efficient usage of the bandwidth spectrum already assigned to aviation, without needing to request additional dedicated bandwidth.

The white paper outlines a jointly proposed vision for the future aviation connectivity landscape which is based on the combination of aviation specific solutions (VDL Mode 2 and SATCOM Performance Class B) – that will offer safety and performance – and commercial, broadband solutions. Together, these will allow for high capacity and efficiency at a manageable cost.

The paper further includes a roadmap to allow a smooth and safe transition to the new approach. To support this, the roadmap leverages existing or already planned infrastructures to the maximum extent possible, so as to optimise the share of complexity between air and ground, while still providing the required performance.

EASA and the FAA are both committed to supporting research in the frame of the Single European Sky ATM Research (SESAR) and NextGen Programmes, and as a next step, supporting the transition strategy presented in the white paper.

Patrick Ky, Executive Director, EASA: “For the first time, we have a common vision from all four organisations in the task force, to establish modern air-ground communications that will meet tomorrow’s requirements. This is the first step toward achieving this, and a major one. We look forward now to working with the many other stakeholders make this vision a reality.”

David Boulter, Acting Associate Administrator, Aviation Safety, Federal Aviation Administration: “Data and connectivity are driving aerospace advances, and they are crucial to safety and efficiency worldwide. We look forward to working together to make the transition to a more modern, harmonized and connected global aviation community.”

EASA and the FAA are looking forward to engaging with the wider aviation community – including ICAO, as well as Regulators, Standards Organisations, Manufacturers, Operators, Air Navigation Service Providers and Communication Service Providers – to build together a safe, performant and harmonised connectivity future for aviation.

 

22nd November 2022

European Union Agency for Railways (ERA) and EASA sign a Memorandum of Cooperation promoting inter-Agency cooperation

https://www.easa.europa.eu/en/newsroom-and-events/news/european-union-agency-railways-era-and-easa-sign-memorandum-cooperation


Patrick Ky and Jean-Marc Cluzeau met with Josef Doppelbauer, Executive Director of the European Union Agency for Railways (ERA) and members of his team in Valenciennes, for the signature of a Memorandum of Cooperation (MoC).

The MoC promotes cooperation and establishes a regular structured dialogue between the Agencies, enhancing the sharing of information, knowledge and experience in three core areas of cooperation.

Core areas of cooperation refer to three essential domains:

  • European Co-ordination centre for Accident and Incident Reporting Systems (ECCAIRS);
  • Big data; and
  • Sustainability.

EASA’s Geert Kinders, Léopold Viroles and Dietmar Bloemen, respectively Points of Contact for the three core areas, participated remotely to the meeting for a joint presentation with their ERA counterparts on the progress made so far.

Patrick Ky and Joseph Doppelbauer congratulated the participants for the work done and discussed the perspectives and expected benefit of future work on cooperation.

 

25th November 2022

Machine Learning Application Approval

https://www.easa.europa.eu/en/research-projects/machine-learning-application-approval


The project deals with the approval of machine learning (ML) technology for systems intended for use in safety-related applications in all domains covered by the EASA Basic Regulation (Regulation (EU) 2018/1139).

Data-driven learning techniques are a major opportunity for the aviation industry but come also with a significant number of challenges with respect to the trustworthiness of ML and deep learning (DL) solutions.

EASA published its Artificial Intelligence Roadmap in February 2020, followed by a first major deliverable, a Concept Paper ‘First usable guidance for level 1 machine learning applications’ in April 2021. This concept paper lays down the basis of EASA future guidance for ML applications approval and identifies a number of areas in which further research is necessary to identify efficient and practicable means of compliance with the defined ‘AI trustworthiness’ objectives.

The intended short-term effect of this project will be to streamline the certification and approval processes by identifying concrete means of compliance with the learning assurance objectives of the EASA guidance for ML applications (levels 1, 2 and 3 as defined in the EASA AI Roadmap), with a specific focus on Level 1B and Level 2.

The achieved medium-term effect of the project will be to alleviate some remaining limitations on the acceptance of ML applications in safety-critical applications.

The requested output

The research results will be a set of reports identifying a set of methods and tools to address the following three important topics:

  • Guarantees on ‘machine learning model generalisation’
  • Guarantees on ‘Data completeness and representativeness’
  • Guarantees on algorithm and model robustness

Along with the project, at least one real-scale aviation use case should be developed to demonstrate the effectivity and usability of the proposed methods and tools. Those use cases should be developed in a software and hardware environment, accessible remotely by EASA or through software package deliveries to EASA. The essential life cycle artefacts developed in the project to address the different steps of the W-shaped process should be made available to EASA.

The work break-down structure of this project is the following:

  • Task 1: Methods and tools for the assessment of completeness and representativeness of data sets (training, validation, and test) in data-driven ML and DL
  • Task 2: Methods and tools for quantification of generalisation guarantees for ML and DL models
  • Task 3: Methods and tools for the verification of an ML algorithm and model robustness/stability
  • Task 4: Communication, dissemination, knowledge-sharing, stakeholder management
  • Task 5: Project management

 

29th November 2022

EASA publishes Research Agenda 2022-2024

https://www.easa.europa.eu/en/newsroom-and-events/news/easa-publishes-research-agenda-2022-2024

EASA has issued its Research Agenda 2022-2024, which includes actions on safety and environmental protection, and additionally in the fields of field security, public health and economic intelligence.

The EASA Research Agenda aims to:

  • support the development of new safety and security management concepts/methods/tools;
  • investigate safety, security and environmental threats;
  • support both proactive and reactive safety management;
  • gain knowledge and data on novel products, technologies or types of operation in view of enabling a regulatory framework supporting innovation while increasing safety levels.

The Agenda covers:

  • Targeted research actions for execution in the short-term in order to respond to identified gaps or open issues in aviation standards, regulations or policies.
  • Long-term research topics to prepare key changes in aviation, e.g. emerging risks or trends, new business models, disruptive technologies

3. Initial Airworthiness

11th November 2022

NPA 2022-10 - Improvement in the survivability of rotorcraft occupants in the event of a crash — Phase 1 – Crash resistant fuel systems

Impacts DOA/POA

https://www.easa.europa.eu/en/document-library/notices-of-proposed-amendment/npa-2022-10 

The objective of this Notice of Proposed Amendment (NPA) is to mitigate the risks linked to a post-crash fire involving a rotorcraft.

This NPA proposes to mandate the installation of a crash-resistant fuel system (CRFS) onto existing rotorcraft designs that are still in production and the retrofit of existing rotorcraft that are operated in the EASA Member States.

Several accident investigation boards put forward safety recommendations (SRs) on the lack of CRFSs for rotorcraft that had been certified before the significant improvements of the rules for fuel system crash resistance were introduced in the 1990s.

The proposed amendments are expected to increase safety and improve the survivability of rotorcraft occupants by significantly reducing the likelihood of a post-crash fire.

 

17th November 2022

Proposed ESF for installation of Dual EFI system without an Independent Secondary Attitude Indicator, ref. ESF-F23.1311-01 (Issue 01)

Applicable to ASPEN AVIONICS STC SA10822SC

https://www.easa.europa.eu/en/document-library/product-certification-consultations/proposed-esf-installation-dual-efi-system 

Official comments to the proposed Consultation Paper are to be filed through the EASA Comment Response Tool.

4. Additional Airworthiness

11th November 2022

NPA 2022-10 - Improvement in the survivability of rotorcraft occupants in the event of a crash — Phase 1 – Crash resistant fuel systems

Impacts 2015/640 & CS26

https://www.easa.europa.eu/en/document-library/notices-of-proposed-amendment/npa-2022-10 

The objective of this Notice of Proposed Amendment (NPA) is to mitigate the risks linked to a post-crash fire involving a rotorcraft.

This NPA proposes to mandate the installation of a crash-resistant fuel system (CRFS) onto existing rotorcraft designs that are still in production and the retrofit of existing rotorcraft that are operated in the EASA Member States.

Several accident investigation boards put forward safety recommendations (SRs) on the lack of CRFSs for rotorcraft that had been certified before the significant improvements of the rules for fuel system crash resistance were introduced in the 1990s.

The proposed amendments are expected to increase safety and improve the survivability of rotorcraft occupants by significantly reducing the likelihood of a post-crash fire.

5. Continuing Airworthiness

No new updates.

6. Air Operations, Aircrew and Medical

16th November 2022

EASA updates Easy Access Rules for Air Operations

https://www.easa.europa.eu/en/newsroom-and-events/news/easa-updates-easy-access-rules-air-operations-1

https://www.easa.europa.eu/en/document-library/easy-access-rules/easy-access-rules-air-operations-regulation-eu-no-9652012 

The European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) has published Revision 19 of the Easy Access Rules for Air Operations (EAR for Air OPS).

This Revision incorporates the new and amended Acceptable Means of Compliance (AMC) and Guidance Material (GM) to Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 on all-weather operations, flight crew training and checking, and continuing-airworthiness management in a single air carrier business grouping (ED Decisions 2022/012/R, 2022/014/R, and 2022/017/R), as well as Implementing Regulation (EU) 2022/2203 postponing the applicability of the requirements for locating an aircraft in distress.

Revision 19 of the Easy Access Rules for Air Operations (EAR for Air OPS) incorporates the Acceptable Means of Compliance (AMC) and Guidance Material (GM) to the Annexes to Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 (‘Air OPS Regulation’), as amended by the following ED Decisions:

  • ED Decision 2022/012/R on all-weather operations;
  • ED Decision 2022/014/R on flight crew training and checking; and
  • ED Decision 2022/017/R on continuing-airworthiness management in a single air carrier business grouping. 

It also includes Implementing Regulation (EU) 2022/2203 amending the Air OPS Regulation as regards the applicability of the requirements for locating an aircraft in distress.

The EAR for Air OPS cover all Annexes to the Air OPS Regulation (Definitions, Part-ARO, Part-ORO, Part-CAT, Part-SPA, Part-NCC, Part-NCO, Part-SPO), as well as the related Certification Specifications (CSs), AMC, and GM. They contain the applicable rules for Air OPS displayed in a consolidated, easy-to-read format with advanced navigation features through links and bookmarks.

 
14th November 2022

Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2022/2203 - Applicability of the requirements for locating an aircraft in distress

https://www.easa.europa.eu/en/document-library/regulations/commission-implementing-regulation-eu-20222203 

Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2022/2203 of 11 November 2022 amending Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 as regards the applicability of the requirements for locating an aircraft in distress

7. EU Aviation Rule Structure

No new updates.

8. Regulatory Authorities

No new updates.

9. Third Country Operators

No new updates.

10. Unmanned Airborne Systems

No new updates.

11. Ground Handling

No new updates.

12. Aerodromes

No new updates.

13. ATM/ANS

11th November 2022

EASA published the updated Easy Access Rules for ATM/ANS

https://www.easa.europa.eu/en/newsroom-and-events/news/easa-published-updated-easy-access-rules-atmans-revision-november-2022-out 

The European Union Aviation Safety Agency has published a new revision of the Easy Access Rules for Air Traffic Management/Air Navigation Services.

This Revision from November 2022 updates the Easy Access Rules for ATM/ANS based on:

  • Corrigendum to Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2020/469
  • Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2020/1177
  • Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2021/665
  • Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2021/1338
  • Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2022/938

These acts amend the Commission Regulation (EU) 2017/373 as regards, among others, requirements for ATM/ANS providers in the U-space airspace designated in controlled airspace, occurrence reporting requirements and updates related to the provision of MET and AIS.

Furthermore, the ED Decision 2022/004/R and the ED Decision 2022/015/R introduce the corresponding AMC and GM.

14. Balloons & Sailplanes

No new updates.

15. SERA

No new updates.